Gareth Jones - Eyewitness to the Holodomor

978 1 86057 122 0
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'This excellent book serves as a warning to journalists not to be taken in by official sources and political ideology but to report what they actually learn through their own efforts. Gamache deserves commendation for his research and careful reconstruction of Jones' reportorial journeys.'
Professor Maurine H. Beasley, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland

'...highly impressive...For the first time we now have an impeccably researched, academic study of this compelling theme. It will certainly appeal to students of journalism...and those interested in international affairs more generally...This study is detailed from cover to cover, the author's sheer enthusiasm for his research and his discoveries are highly infectious.'
J. Graham Jones, Morgannwg LV11 (The Journal of Glamorgan History) Read complete review here 

'...meticulously researched book [that] returns Gareth Jones to his rightful status, as one of the most outstanding journalists of his generation, in a tumultuous era that depended upon honest journalism as its main source of news.' 
Nigel Linsan Colley, www.garethjones.org

Gareth Jones (1905-1934), the young Welsh investigative journalist, is revered in Ukraine as a national hero and is now rightly recognised as the first reporter to reveal the horror of the Holodomor, the Soviet Government-induced famine of the early 1930s, which killed millions of Ukrainians.

Gareth Jones - Eyewitness to the Holodomor is a meticulous study of the efforts made by the the Aberystwyth and Cambridge-educated journalist, a fluent Russian-speaker, to investigate the Soviet Government’s denials, that its Five Year Plan had led to mass  starvation, by visiting Ukraine in 1933 and reporting what he saw and witnessed: ‘I walked along through villages and twelve collective farms. Everywhere was the cry, “There is no bread. We are dying”’.

Determined to alert the world to the suffering in Ukraine and to expose Stalin’s policies and prejudices towards the Ukrainian   people, Jones published numerous articles in the UK (The Times, Daily Express and Western Mail) and the USA (New York Evening News and Chicago Daily News) with headlines such as ‘Famine Grips Russia. Millions Dying’, but soon saw his credibility and integrity attacked and denigrated by Soviet sympathizers, most famously by Moscow-based Walter Duranty of the New York Times.

Gareth Jones was killed by bandits the following year, on the eve of his 30th birthday, whilst travelling in Japanese-controlled China. There   remain strong suspicions that Jones’ murder was arranged by the Soviets in revenge for his eyewitness reporting which brought global attention to the Holodomor.

Ray Gamache is an Assistant Professor of Journalism in the Department of Mass Communications at King's College, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.